Memo to the President: End the Shutdown Now

| October 6 2013
John Walker

 Five Easy Pieces

By the time the weekend rolled around and the nation entered day five of the government shutdown, the whole spectacle was wearing thin.

The House and Senate were locked in a hopeless stalemate. The House continued to pass bills to reopen the government one step at a time. The Senate continued to insist on opening the whole government or nothing at all.

The president led the way with his pledge of no negotiations. Looming over the need to fund the federal government is the coming battle over raising the national debt.

Obamacare remains the real issue. Democrats want a “clean” continuing resolution to fund the government and avoid discussing Obamacare at all costs. But they’re only delaying the day of reckoning. Eventually they will have to face the need to adjust the national healthcare scheme.

Obamacare is off to a stumbling start. The software needed to sign-up Obamacare enrollees is a shambles. The public remains unclear about the details of the law. Obamacare remains unpopular for a majority of Americans.

No matter what happens in the government shutdown standoff, eventually the president will need to negotiate when it comes time to dealing with the national debt later this month. And when he negotiates, Obamacare will be on the table.

Here, in the president’s own words, is a plan for ending the government shutdown, courtesy of Matthew Streit at the Heritage Foundation.

1. “Here’s the deal”: Have a serious conversation with congressional leadership to talk about the real issue driving the shutdown—the negative consequences of Obamacare. Quit giving us lengthy law school lectures about why you are right and then dismissing the class.

2. “Let me be clear”: Mr. President, you’ve already delayed or repealed 14 provisions in Obamacare. Why are you unwilling to recognize how Obamacare has negatively impacted the American people? Certainly, it shouldn’t take wrecking the economy and putting bureaucrats between doctors and their patients. There is a better way.

3. “It will not be easy”: The American people need a leader, not a lecturer.

4. “Make no mistake”: Despite the fact that you claim Obamacare will lower premiums, expand coverage, and increase wellness, the evidence is overwhelmingly against you. Obamacare is raising premiums for most Americans, making it difficult for those out of work to find jobs, and cutting workers’ hours. The cost of Obamacare to the budget, the taxpayers, and to the future of health care in this country is too high.

5. “Yes we can”: When a majority of Americans oppose your signature accomplishment and the implementation of the law isn’t working, it’s time for a different course. We can reform health care so that patients are in charge of their health care decisions.

2 comments
dleeper47
dleeper47 moderator

I wish the Obama automatons would read this article, study the references, and wake up. 

But I can already hear their eloquent rejoinder: O-BA-MA! O-BA-MA! O-BA-MA!