Rep. Paul Gosar Votes Against NDAA

| June 15 2013

“I kept my promise to uphold and protect the Constitution” 

WASHINGTON, D.C. – U.S. Congressman Paul Gosar, D.D.S (AZ-04) released the following statement after voting against H.R. 1960 – the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) of 2013 – for failing to include language which would have protected American citizens against indefinite detention:

“In voting against the NDAA, I kept my promise to uphold and protect the Constitution. I will not vote to continue policies that trample on our constitutional rights.”

“I voted in favor of amendments to improve this bill’s adherence to the Constitution.”

“Standing in defense of the Constitution could not be more important today.” Rep. Gosar continued, “We have witnessed, over the last several weeks, government abuses of power and an assault on our constitutional rights in the name of national security. My no vote addresses this and is a reminder that the Constitution serves as chains to bind the misuse of government.”

2 comments
SuzanneNoel
SuzanneNoel

Excellent! Now why don't the other congressmen read the Constitution and vote accordingly!

WesternFreePress
WesternFreePress moderator

 @SuzanneNoel It depends. The true statists like state power, so they don't vote against it. On the other side, you have conservatives who aren't statists, but who are for a strong defense. Being for a strong defense is understandable; indeed, external security is the FIRST duty of any government. From a social contractarian viewpoint, even a minarchist libertarian needs to recognize that. The impulse for strong defense is not a bad thing---it is adherence to the first, core duty of government. The question then becomes **how much** defense and what kind of defense. Obviously everyone pays lip service to the idea that we need to have maximum deference to civil liberties, but not everyone walks the walk. A big problem with our whole defense posture now is one of laziness. Technology instead of human intel. Broad-spectrum surveillance instead of controlling the borders and ports of entry and knowing who is in the country.

 

In other words, the reasons behind some congressmen's failure to vote against the NDAA are more understandable and forgiveable than others. They should all get with the program, though, and start focusing on a national defense strategy that concentrates directly on the problem targets rather than just collecting tons of data.