Background gun check records are saved (Congress ignored again!)

| April 3 2013

By Alan Corwin

The lamestream media told you . . .

It’s only reasonable, and studies show the overwhelming majority of Americans support universal background checks. We’re not talking about registering guns.

The Uninvited Ombudsman notes however that . . .

How soon we forget. When the NICS computer was built and turned on by attorney general Janet Reno, in compliance with the Brady bill in 1994, she announced that the system not only would not erase records immediately after a gun-buyer background check as required by law, it could NOT erase records at all. She said it with a straight face, to Congress.

The Justice Dept. under Bill Clinton, had built a computer capable of checking out every American, from one spot in West Virginia, controlled by the FBI, a dream project the Bureau was dying for, and the quarter-billion dollar computer was incapable of deleting a record. That’s what Janet Reno wanted us to believe, it’s what she told us, and who knows — maybe it’s exactly what she built. We have no way to know. [Note: C’mon it’s a computer, there’s no such thing as one that can’t delete a file, she lied through her teeth, had planned this all along].

Congress went wild, because the bill that authorized the monster computer (read, buildings full of equipment and staff) required that background check records be destroyed instantly after the background check was completed. Congress was well aware, and had been pressured incessantly by its constituents, not to start creating rosters of gun owners. The only way the background check got in the bill at all was with instant destruction of the record mandatory. Turns out statute didn’t matter much to the feds.

Gun-owner registries are the start of confiscations, everyone knew that, history proved it over and over all last century. Now the government had gone and done that very thing, directly against the law. The so-called background check computer was a recording device.

They use the same machine today of course and no, you can’t look at it. The FBI, which knew the Brady bill was its one vehicle for their much-coveted one-stop-shopping ID checker, didn’t scrap it and start over. They only had this shot at the $250 million needed to build the thing, including the “campus” features, ongoing operating costs, and of course the upgrades, maintenance, and literal federal jobs program that goes with it. But it’s still the NICS system Janet Reno gave us, retrofitted to erase some records somehow, probably. There is no way to know. The FBI will not allow you in for an independent audit.

It’s worse than that. Multiple federal sources have revealed that the information checking infrastructure of the NICS system, and its interconnected NCIC and III data systems, link with international sources of criminal data. Record destruction is not a requirement anywhere but here (and even here it can be disregarded at will, as we’ve seen), so “privacy” might as well all be wishful thinking. On top of this, ten consecutive sets of backups are made, it’s routine, according to agents within the FBI, and these are sequentially stored and destroyed, over some time frame, on and off site… it’s complicated.

The government has already told us that background check records are saved. It has built a system designed to save records and register gun owners, with no way to behave differently, in direct defiance of written law. It has provided no way to confirm that such records are not saved.

This is like hearing Iran continuously say they are not building nuclear weapons, while they continue to build their nuclear weapons.  The calls for universal background checks are a deception. The NICS background check system is designed as and fully functional as a record storage system and federal gun registry. The risks it presents to freedom is so significantly great it should be dismantled, and replaced with the equally effective, far less expensive, non-invasive transparency of the BIDS system. http://www.gunlaws.com/BIDSvNICS.htm

4 comments
dleeper47
dleeper47 moderator

All databases from the simplest to the most complex are based on four operations often called CRUD for Create, Retrieve, Update, Delete.  

 

All four operations are always present, *unless* the database owner has deliberately blocked one or more of them, temporarily or permanently.

 

When the Justice Dept violates the provisions of a law they are expected to execute, whom does  ongress turn to for prosecution?  The Justice Dept?

Blaine Dunning
Blaine Dunning

This is about control, the flow of information the government keeps on it's citizens to use when they need it. Power and Control, two things governments love more than anything.

WesternFreePress
WesternFreePress moderator

 @dleeper47 Remember when Al Gore said "No controlling legal authority"? The amount of times that that phrase has popped into my head in the last four years has been terrifying. Simply put, representative government cannot work if it is run by rotten people. As brilliant as our system is, it is also fragile. Once you start getting up near the pinnacles of power, the ability to hold them accountable becomes very difficult. The branches are coequal. There are political concerns. A faction may not have the political might needed to hold the leader of a more powerful faction accountable. And then there are all the unelected bureaucrats and judges. When J. Adams talked about our system being inadequate for anything but a moral people, he didn't just mean the electorate, he meant the officials. If they chose to be immoral, there is little that can be done to stop them.