Pot, the kettle is calling on line 1

| August 21 2012
Christopher Cook

Harry Reid, in an act of political theater that will go down in history as one of the sleaziest in political history, recently said that his dog-groomer’s boyfriend’s tennis-instructor’s cousin told a friend to tell Harry Reid that Mitt Romney didn’t pay taxes for ten years. Those who follow Harry Reid with even passing attention aren’t particularly surprised to find the word “sleaze” rhetorically proximate to Harry Reid, but even still, this was Reid plumbing for a new low in a basement he’s been digging for decades.

But it gets even worse. For Harry Reid to accuse Mitt Romney, a man who appears to be of sterling character, of financial cheating appears to be the height of hypocrisy:

Imagine that someone grows up in poverty, works his way through law school by holding the night shift as a Capitol Hill policeman, and spends all but two years of his career as a public servant. Now imagine that this person’s current salary — and he’s at the top of his game — is $193,400. You probably wouldn’t expect him to have millions in stocks, bonds, and real estate.

But, surprise, he does, if he’s our Senate majority leader, whose net worth is between 3 and 10 million dollars, according to OpenSecrets.org.

Here’s a good one:

In 2004, the senator made $700,000 off a land deal that was, to say the least, unorthodox. It started in 1998 when he bought a parcel of land with attorney Jay Brown, a close friend whose name has surfaced multiple times in organized-crime investigations and whom one retired FBI agent described as “always a person of interest.” Three years after the purchase, Reid transferred his portion of the property to Patrick Lane LLC, a holding company Brown controlled. But Reid kept putting the property on his financial disclosures, and when the company sold it in 2004, he profited from the deal — a deal on land that he didn’t technically own and that had nearly tripled in value in six years.

Or how about this?

Here’s another example: The Los Angeles Timesreported in November 2006 that when Reid became Senate majority leader he committed to making earmark reform a priority, saying he’d work to keep congressmen from using federal dollars for pet projects in their districts. It was a good idea but an odd one for the senator to espouse. He had managed to get $18 million set aside to build a bridge across the Colorado River between Laughlin, Nev., and Bullhead City, Ariz., a project that wasn’t a priority for either state’s transportation agency. His ownership of 160 acres of land nearby that stood to appreciate considerably from the project had nothing to do with the decision, according to one of his aides. The property’s value has varied since then. On his financial-disclosure forms from 2006, it was valued at $250,000 to $500,000. Open Secrets now lists it as his most valuable asset, worth $1 million to $5 million as of 2010.

Or this?

How Reid acquired that land is interesting, too. He put $10,000 into a pension fund his friend Clair Haycock controlled, to take over the 160-acre parcel at a price far below its assessed value. Six months later, Reid introduced legislation that would help Haycock’s industry, a move many observers said appeared to be a quid pro quo, though Reid and Haycock denied that the legislation was the result of a property deal.

 

I don’t agree with this little boy’s cornfield policy, but I do very much agree with his overall assessment:

0 comments