Unemployment rates rise in 44 states

| August 18 2012
Hannah Thoreson

“We tried our plan, and it worked!” — President Obama

Well, maybe.  Then why another Friday data dump from the Department of Labor with the latest state-level unemployment stats?  If it’s working, in an election year one would almost expect a press conference trumpeting the success of the economy on a Monday morning when the media is looking for something to cover.

But that’s not what just happened.  The unemployment rate just rose in 44 states, including most of the electoral college swing states.

From Reuters:

In those states – Nevada, Florida, Colorado, Wisconsin, Ohio, Virginia and Iowa – jobless rates all rose or were flat in July. Nevada again had the highest rate in the nation at 12 percent, while Florida’s 8.8 percent and Colorado’s 8.3 percent were both at or above the July national rate of 8.3 percent.

The jobless rate also spiked in Michigan, which should be an easy win for Obama but is now sitting at 9% unemployment — up 0.4% from the month before.

Indeed, Gallup’s poll-based unemployment survey shows unemployment overall in the U.S. up 0.4% from the beginning of June:  from 8% to 8.4%.  These are not numbers that bode well for President Obama’s re-election bid.

The Obama Administration has tried every possible gimmick in an effort to try and move the needle on that number, and it’s not happening.  It’s not happening because these are failed, statist policies that have been tried over and over again, and they have never worked.  Creating a green energy economy dependent entirely on government giveaways hasn’t created the tens of thousands of jobs that were supposed to materialize.  Bailouts and selective tax policy has failed to create new, high-paying manufacturing jobs for people in struggling Rust Belt cities.  Printing money and “pump priming” at the Federal Reserve have caused the value of the U.S. dollar to decline.  Economic stimulus has only succeeded in distributing a trillion dollars worth of pork projects to corrupt developers slow to produce any real results on concrete or in job creation.  We’ve tried these plans — and they failed.

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