Media pounces on Salmon lobbying connection

| July 18 2012
Hannah Thoreson

Several major media outlets in the Valley have now reported on Congressional candidate Matt Salmon’s connection to the health care reform law passed in 2010.  The Phoenix New Times was one of the first to cover the story, and now the Arizona Capitol Times is getting in on the action.

Policy Impact Communications, the lobbying firm that Salmon worked for in 2009 and 2010, was paid $190,000 by two pharmaceutical firms to lobby on the initial version of the health care legislation.

The ad cites seven lobbying disclosure forms on which Salmon, who served in Congress from 1995 through 2000, is listed as a lobbyist for the pharmaceutical companies. The forms, which were filed with the U.S. House of Representatives, list Salmon as one of four people for Policy Impact Communications who performed lobbying work for the companies related to HR 3200.

One of the things Salmon is listed as lobbying for is the removal of lifetime caps on insurance benefits. Although HR 3200 never received a vote on the House floor, most of its provisions were ultimately included in the final version of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, which was signed into law in March 2010.

Matt Salmon, of course, has continued to deny that he lobbied for the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

“The firms I worked for were retained only to change this narrow provision,” Salmon said. “I personally never lobbied on behalf of this client, and have always remained completely opposed to the Affordable Health Care Act or Obamacare.”

His opponent insists that this constitutes an admission that Salmon lobbied for an expansion of prescription drug coverage under the President’s health care law.

“Only a Washington lobbyist could work to make a bill larger, and then claim, with a straight face, that he didn’t support its passage,” Adams said in a written statement.

The TV ad that has stirred up the latest controversy over Matt Salmon’s lobbying career can be seen below.

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