Obama tax hike: 26th time’s the charm?

| July 10 2012

BROKEN RECORD: President Obama Has Called for Small Business Tax Hike More Than 25 Times This Year  

…President Obama again called for a massive tax hike that will hurt small businesses and make it harder to create jobsHow will his tax hike plan create jobs?  It won’t.  And instead of addressing the sky-high unemployment rate – which has been above eight percent for 41 months – the president has been obsessed with raising taxes on the small businesses that create the majority of new jobs in America.  Here are more than 25 times the president has called for these small business tax hikes, just this year alone…

  • “On the other hand, if you make under $250,000 a year, like 98 percent of American families, your taxes shouldn’t go up.” (State of the Union Address, 1/24/12)
  • ”On the other hand, if you make less than $250,000 a year, which 98 percent of all Americans do, then your taxes shouldn’t go up.  I think that’s a fair approach.” (Remarks, 1/26/12)
  • “If, on the other hand, you make less than $250,000 a year, which includes 98 percent of you, your taxes shouldn’t go up.” (Remarks, 1/25/12)
  • “On the other hand, if you make less than $250,000 a year — which is 98 percent of you — your taxes shouldn’t go up.” (Remarks, 1/25/12)
  • “On the other hand, if you decide to go into a less lucrative profession, if you decide to become a teacher — and we need teachers — if you decide to go into public service, if you decide to go into a helping profession — if you make less than $250,000 a year — which 98 percent of Americans do — then your taxes shouldn’t go up. This is part of the idea of shared responsibility.” (Remarks, 1/27/12)
  • “Now, if, like 98 percent of American families, you make less than $250,000 a year, your taxes shouldn’t go up.” (Remarks, 2/16/12)
  • “If, like 98 percent of Americans, you make $250,000 a year or less, your taxes don’t need to go up right now.”  (Remarks, 2/17/12)
  • “And if you do that, that means that if you make less than $250,000 a year, like 98 percent of Americans do, you shouldn’t see your taxes go up.” (Remarks, 2/21/12)
  • “Now, if you make less than $250,000 a year, which is 98 percent of Americans, your taxes shouldn’t go up.” (Remarks, 3/1/12)
  • “And you know what, most folks who’ve done well, they agree.  They understand.  They understand that folks making $250,000 a year or less — 98 percent of American families — can’t see their taxes going up. … But folks like me, we can afford to do a little bit more if it means protecting our kids and making sure that we’re investing in the future.” (Remarks, 3/9/12)
  • “We’ve said if you make less than $250,000 a year, which is 98 percent of Americans, your taxes shouldn’t go up.” (Remarks, 3/16/12)
  • “This is not — look, if you make $250,000 a year or less, which is 98 percent of Americans, your taxes shouldn’t go up.” (Remarks, 3/16/12)
  • “Now, if you make less than $250,000 a year — like 98 percent of American families — your taxes shouldn’t go up because right now folks are struggling still to dig themselves out of this incredible recession.” (Remarks, 3/30/12)
  • “What I’ve said is, if you make $250,000 a year or less — like 98 percent of American families, then your taxes don’t need to go up.  Folks are still struggling.  But if you’re doing really well, you can do a little bit more.” (Remarks, 3/30/12)
  • “On the other hand, if you make under $250,000 a year – like 98 percent of American families do – your taxes shouldn’t go up.” (Weekly Address, 3/31/12)
  • “On the other hand, if you make under $250,000 a year — like 98 percent of American families do — then your taxes shouldn’t go up. That’s the proposal.” (Remarks, 4/3/12)
  • “Then, what the rule says is you should pay the same percentage of your income in taxes as middle-class families do. You shouldn’t get special tax breaks.  You shouldn’t be able to get special loopholes. And if we do that, then it makes it affordable for us to be able to say for those people who make under $250,000 a year — like 98 percent of American families do — then your taxes don’t go up.” (Remarks, 4/10/12)
  • “That’s not — they may call in class envy or — that’s just being fair. And by doing that, that also allows us then to say to folks who are making $250,000 a year or less — like 98 percent of American families — that their taxes don’t go up.” (Remarks, 4/10/12)
  • “If on the other hand, you make less than $250,000 a year — like 98 percent of American families do — your taxes shouldn’t go up.” (Remarks, 4/11/12)
  • “On the other hand, if you make less than $250,000 a year — like 98 percent of American families do — your taxes shouldn’t go up.” (Weekly Address, 4/14/12)
  • “And we said you should at least pay the same percentage in income tax as middle class families do — as a teacher or a bus driver. And by doing that, that helps us afford being to say to the 98 percent of families who make $250,000 a year or less, your taxes won’t go up.” (Remarks, 4/18/12)
  • “Now, the reason that’s important is because if we abided by that rule, then we could say to folks what I have repeatedly said, which is, the 98 percent of Americans who make $250,000 a year or less, your taxes shouldn’t go up.” (Remarks,  4/18/12)
  • “All I’ve said with respect to that $250,000-to-$1 million group is, we can afford to go back to the Clinton tax rates if we want to close the deficit, which ultimately will be good for his business. Those of us who have done well can afford to do a little bit more, and those who have done really, really well, like Warren Buffett, should be able to do more. I think it’s important to remember that even for folks who don’t feel rich, if you’re making over $250,000 a year, there’s 98 percent of the country who are making less than you.” (AARP Magazine, 5/24/12)
  • “I think somebody like myself, I should pay a little bit more in taxes…because I don’t need that tax cut big enough. I don’t need it bad enough. And you know what, it turns out most millionaires and billionaires don’t need it either. … And what we’ve proposed is simply, well, let’s go back to the rates under the last Democratic administration when we created 22 million jobs.” (Remarks, 6/1/12)
  • “For us to go back to the tax rates under Bill Clinton for folks who are millionaires or billionaires, that’s not asking too much.  That’s consistent with the idea that everybody does their fair share.” (Remarks, 6/7/12)
  • “If you want to really do something about it, if you really want to get the deficit under control without sacrificing all the investments that I’ve talked about, our tax code has to ask the wealthiest Americans to pay a little bit more…I don’t believe that giving someone like me a $250,000 tax cut is more valuable to our future than hiring transformative teachers, or providing financial aid to the children of a middle-class family.” (Remarks, 6/14/12)
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