Occupiers still at it

| January 2 2012
Christopher Cook

They may have faded from above-the-fold headlines, but the anti-capitalist mob known as Occupy Wall Street (or Occupy wherever) is still committing crimes. Sixty eight “protesters” (read “rioters”) were

arrested as they tore down the barricades surrounding New York City’s Zuccotti Park just before midnight on New Year’s Eve.

At least one person was accused of assaulting a police officer, who suffered cuts on one hand. [ . . . ]

 . . . the crowd piled the barricade pieces in the center of the park and stood on top of them, chanting and singing.

If conservative protesters were to engage in these kinds of activities, and in the kind of stuff that has characterized the Occupy movement since October, the media would be doing piece after piece about the rise of fascism in America. But the media have bent over backwards to minimize the Occupier’s criminality and mob behavior.

But another question arises: where are the mayors? Where are the cities in all of this? There is no such thing as a First Amendment right to create a tent city for two months, but Occupiers around the country were allowed to do so on First Amendment grounds. Not that tea partiers would ever do that, but if they had, would they have gotten away with it? Or is the double standard in our country really that pervasive? It’s hard to say, without a crystal ball into a parallel universe where everything else was the same except the tea partiers tried to do so.

Of course, we now have Occupy the Rose Parade:

But this year, hundreds of extra police officers from numerous law enforcement agencies are also moving into place due to the expected demonstration by anti-Wall Street protesters who will be falling in at the end of the procession with their own march.

“We take any potential issue seriously,” said Pasadena police Lt. Phlunte’ Riddle.

Police, parade and city officials have held numerous meetings with the organizers of Occupy the Rose Parade to ensure that protesters keep to the end of the two-hour long procession, where spectators and other groups who want to make political statements regularly tag along.

If they are obstreperous and commit crimes, will we hear much about it? Or will we instead be treated to yet another editorial about how “civility” hasn’t quite returned to America in the wake of the Giffords shooting.